Reasons For The Munich Agreement

In the spring of 1938, Hitler openly began to support calls from German spokesmen living in the Sudetenland region of Czechoslovakia for closer relations with Germany. Hitler had recently annexed Austria to Germany and the conquest of Czechoslovakia was the next step in his plan to create a “Greater Germany”. The Czechoslovakian government hoped that Britain and France would help in the event of a German invasion, but British Prime Minister Chamberlain tried to avoid war. He made two trips to Germany in September and offered favorable agreements to Hitler, but Fuhrer responded to his demands. Under the Munich Agreement, the entire territory, mainly German, was to be returned to Czechoslovakia by 10 October. Poland and Hungary occupied other parts of the country and, after a few months, Czechoslovakia ceased to exist and what was left of Slovakia became a German puppet state. After Poland learned that populated territories in Poland were to be transferred to Germany, Poland issued a note to the Czechoslovak government regarding the immediate conclusion of an agreement providing for the unquestionable occupation of Polish territory by Polish troops; An agreement on referendums is expected to follow in districts with a large proportion of the Polish population. [75] One aspect of the immense agitation of the last fourteen days must affect anyone who thinks about his or her history. In the three most powerful countries in Central and Eastern Europe, people had no right to know what was said and done outside. There seems to have been very little news in Russia.

In Germany and Italy, the message was deliberately falsified while it was not repressed. The German people were not to know the embassy of President Roosevelt. The Italian people were led to believe that Chamberlain agreed with Hitler and was only putting pressure on Benes. One of his speeches gave them a false version. The Manchester Guardian covered every corner of history, from the details of the deal Chamberlain, which appeared on the balcony of Buckingham Palace, to unease among other nations. One editorial found that the sheet of paper he was waving on his return to Britain was almost worthless. The New York Times made the front page of the Munich agreement: “Hitler receives less than his claims from the Sudetenland,” and reports that a “joyful crowd” had applauded Daladier on his return to France and that Chamberlain had been “wildly applauded” upon his return to the UK. [54] The agreement authorizing germany`s annexation of the Sudetenland was signed on 29 September 1938. Meanwhile, the British government has asked Benea to ask for a mediator. As he did not want to sever his government`s relations with Western Europe, the heirs reluctantly agreed. The British appointed Lord Runciman, the former Liberal cabinet minister, who arrived in Prague on 3 August to convince Benes to accept an acceptable plan for the Sudeten Germans.

[23] On 20 July, Bonnet informed the Czechoslovakian ambassador in Paris that France, while publicly declaring its support for the Czechoslovakian negotiations, was not prepared to go to war on the Sudetenland. [23] In August, the German press was full of stories of Czechoslovakian atrocities against the Sudeten Germans, with the intention of forcing the West to put pressure on the Czechoslovakians to make concessions. [24] Hitler hoped that the Czechoslovaks would refuse and that the West would feel morally justified in abandoning the Czechoslovaks to their fate. [25] In August, Germany sent 750,000 troops along the border with Czechoslovakia, officially as part of military maneuvers. [9] [25] On September 4 or 5,[23] Erbe presented the fourth plan, which met almost all of the requirements of the agreement.